Buffalo Translational Consortium News

Putting surgeons, researchers together is leading to world-class innovations

Posted on 05/19/17 at 03:30 pm
Putting surgeons and researchers together in the same facility is leading to world-class innovations.

L. Nelson “Nick” Hopkins is a pioneer in the use of catheters — long, flexible tubes — inserted into the vascular system in the groin and threaded to the brain to treat strokes. The procedure, once called “crazy” by the medical establishment, is now the preferred method in many situations.

His early use of endovascular surgery led Hopkins, SUNY Distinguished Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery, and a neurosurgeon with UB Neurosurgery, to confer with other types of surgeons — cardiologists, vascular surgeons and radiologists — who were using the technique. The cross-referencing broadened Hopkins’ appreciation for coming at a problem from different angles.

That cooperative approach is the driving force behind numerous research efforts now underway at a facility on the burgeoning Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus. The building is a partnership between UB and Kaleida Health that Hopkins helped usher into existence. The 10-story building houses Kaleida’s Gates Vascular Institute, dedicated to patient care, of which Hopkins is president, and UB’s Clinical and Translational Research Center (CTRC), dedicated to translational research. The juxtaposition allows for an unprecedented level of collaboration among clinical researchers, translational scientists, surgeons and engineers.  

Researchers in UB’s CTRC study problems across the entire translational spectrum, from biomarkers for sudden cardiac death and the genetic architecture of Alzheimer’s disease to depression-related asthma and new treatments for macular degeneration.

Read more here.

Dubocovich honored with President’s Medal

Posted on 05/18/17 at 07:46 am

Margarita L. Dubocovich, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of pharmacology and toxicology has been awarded the UB President’s Medal, which recognizes “truly extraordinary effort on behalf the university and the communities we serve,” according to University at Buffalo President Satish K. Tripathi, PhD.

Tripathi presented the award during the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences commencement ceremony on April 28.

“Dr. Dubocovich has had a broad and profound impact in her field of study, as well as her academic community at the University at Buffalo, as a scholar, teacher, mentor and administrator,” Tripathi said, adding that her work “truly embodies the excellence of our faculty and the university.”

Dubocovich is considered the world’s foremost authority on melatonin research and the regulation of the hormone’s receptors in the brain and body. She is credited with discovering the functional role of melatonin receptor types that have revolutionized the field;  her research has significantly broadened the scientific understanding of melatonin and its effect on circadian rhythms, sleep disorders and depression.

CTSI well-represented at annual ACTS Translational Science conference in D.C.

Posted on 05/15/17 at 01:08 pm

Shown in photo: Sebastian G. Ciancio, DDS, Distinguished Service Professor, Chair, Department of Periodontics and Endodontics, School of Dental Medicine (left) and Jessie Polanco, PhD student, CTSI Diversity Supplement, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences (right)

More than 20 UB faculty and staff members were on hand to represent the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) at the Translational Science 2017 conference held in Washington, D.C., April 19-21.

Organized by the Association for Clinical and Translational Science, the stated purpose of the meeting is to “bring together all of the disciplines involved in clinical and translational research, for the shared benefits of networking and education.”

UB’s attendees conducted nine poster presentations, and two were invited for Distinguished Oral Presentations by conference organizers:

(As published in the Translational Science 2017 Onsite Program with the assigned poster or presentation numbers. UB personnel who attended are italicized.)

28 Prescription Opioid Dependence in Western New York: Using Data Analytics to Find an Answer to the Opioid Epidemic

Shyamashree Sinha, Gale Burstein, Kenneth Leonard, Timothy Murphy, Peter Elkin

46 Increased Galectin-3 Expression after Acute Myocardial Infarction is Strongly Associated with Cardiac Inflammation, Fibrosis and Subsequent Development of Major Cardiovascular Events

Umesh Sharma, Wassim Mosleh, Milind, Guadhari, Gen Suzuki, Saraswati Pokharel, John Canty

Another submission from UB’s delegation received the ACTS Burroughs Wellcome Fund Travel Award:

A31 Muscarinic receptor M3R signaling prevents efficient myelin repair by human and mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells

Jessie Polanco, R. Ross Welliver, Richard Seidman, Anjali Sinha, Melanie O’Bara, Zainab Khaku, Fraser Sim

Presenting posters at the conference were:

A209 PTSD: Understanding Differences in Trauma Cognitions, Memory and Emotional Regulation

Ellen Volpe, Tiffany Jenzer, Lauren Rodriguez, Jennifer Read

B181 A Path Perspective on Bio-psychosocial Predictors of Health Status in Peripheral Arterial Disease

Nikhil Satchidanand, Jeffrey Fine, Gregory Cherr

B95 Pretreatment Peripheral Blood Monocyte Gene Expression Signature is Predictive of Patient Response to Dendritic Cell Vaccination for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

Jason Muhitch, Anand Sharda, Alexander Wald, Mohammad Habiby Kermany, Katja Koppen, Thomas Hampton, Jan Fisher, Camilo Fadul, Marc Ernstoff, Thomas Schwaab

A45 Estimating Microscopic Structures of Glomeruli in Renal Pathology

Pinaki Sarder, Rabi Yacoub, John Tomaszewski

A132 Best Practices for Social and Behavioral Research: A New Course to Address Good Clinical Practice and Preliminary Course Evaluation

Susan Lynn Murphy, Christy Byks-Jazayeri, Brenda Eakin, Jordan Hahn, Brandon Lynn, Elias Samuels, Fanny Ennever, Sarah Peyre, Margarita Dubocovich, Wajeeh Bajwa

A53 High Throughput Phenotype and the Increased Risk of OSA in Rosacia Patients

Peter Elkin, Sarah Mullin, Sanjay Sethi, Shyamashree Sinha, Animesh Sinha

28 Prescription Opioid Dependence in Western New York: Using Data Analytics to Find an Answer to the Opioid Epidemic

Shyamashree Sinha, Gale Burstein, Kenneth Leonard, Timothy Murphy, Peter Elkin

46 Increased Galectin-3 Expression after Acute Myocardial Infarction is Strongly Associated with Cardiac Inflammation, Fibrosis and Subsequent Development of Major Cardiovascular Events

Umesh Sharma, Wassim Mosleh, Milind, Guadhari, Gen Suzuki, Saraswati Pokharel, John Canty

A31 Muscarinic receptor M3R signaling prevents efficient myelin repair by human and mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells

Jessie Polanco, R. Ross Welliver, Richard Seidman, Anjali Sinha, Melanie O’Bara, Zainab Khaku, Fraser Sim

 

 

IMSD grant renewal means $2.3 million for students from underrepresented groups

Posted on 05/15/17 at 10:15 am
Mentored Career Development Award Program Mid-Program Reflection, March 2017

A National Institutes of Health (NIH) training grant aimed at providing professional development resources and mentoring for doctoral students in several UB schools has been renewed for another five years.

The Initiative for Maximizing Student Development (IMSD) will provide $2.3 million in funding to train 20 new biomedical and behavioral scientists from underrepresented groups between now and 2021.
The institutional grant benefits doctoral students in the following schools and institutes: Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Public Health and Health Professions, College of Arts and Sciences, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Roswell Park Cancer Institute Graduate Division.

The Initiative for Maximizing Student Development (IMSD) will provide $2.3 million in funding to train 20 new biomedical and behavioral scientists from underrepresented groups between now and 2021.

The institutional grant benefits doctoral students in the following schools and institutes:

  • Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences
  • School of Dental Medicine
  • School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
  • School of Public Health and Health Professions, College of Arts and Sciences
  • School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
  • Roswell Park Cancer Institute Graduate Division

“When you get an infusion of funds such as this, it provides the seed to energize everyone,” says Margarita L. Dubocovich, PhD, senior associate dean for diversity and inclusion, the principal investigator on the grant.

Read more here.

 

Page 1 of 29